Naval Stories

Use this forum to discuss the November 2019 Book of the month, "Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath", by Randy Miller.
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jeminah28
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Re: Naval Stories

Post by jeminah28 »

Zeix wrote:
29 Nov 2019, 23:23
jeminah28 wrote:
10 Nov 2019, 02:00
The slap game. I thought it was a joke at first, but Zack did his best. I wonder how young men sacrifice their life way back on the times of the events in the book and treated 'harshly', something like that.
This sounds hilarious :lol:
All I thought was being a sailor would always treat fairly by their leaders. However, subordinates will undergo some initiation process something like that in the story. My seafarers do tell me.
"Jesus Christ is the Saviour of the world."

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Post by tannus »

Hester3 wrote:
12 Nov 2019, 14:11
I just started reading the book, but what stood out to me was that the characters did not really care what their shipmates' background was. They would only start to ask personal questions once the first bonds of friendship has already been laid. It is as if the military is a great equalizer, where the only distinction between men is their job title and rank.
This is so true. I hope in every field and every person behaves like this.

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Post by tannus »

djr6090 wrote:
04 Nov 2019, 11:00
So far, the most vivid scene was the trip from the harbor to Olongapo over the 'sh*t River.' My husband tells me that there were little Phillipino children who would taunt the sailors to toss coins over the edge of the bridge, and then dive into that mess to retrieve them. In reality, they had a net stretched below the surface that caught the coins, and they had a coin in their hand when they jumped in. They would harvest the money from the net just after dark. My husband's buddies gave him no end of ribbing for falling for these tricks.
Such a trick :shock:
Hope your husband's buddies stopped ribbing after a while :D

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Post by Akpome1 »

My favourite moment is Zechariah Martins joining the navy straight from high school. It is a courageous moment indeed!

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I like the relationships that are formed between the enlisted men and the descriptions of the relationship between the enlisted, the non commissioned officers and the officers on the ship. I found this to be very realistic. I also liked how they were best buddies while deployed, each one going their separate ways afterwards, but keeping contact for years - also very realistic.

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Post by pshaw1414 »

djr6090 wrote:
04 Nov 2019, 11:00
So far, the most vivid scene was the trip from the harbor to Olongapo over the 'sh*t River.' My husband tells me that there were little Phillipino children who would taunt the sailors to toss coins over the edge of the bridge, and then dive into that mess to retrieve them. In reality, they had a net stretched below the surface that caught the coins, and they had a coin in their hand when they jumped in. They would harvest the money from the net just after dark. My husband's buddies gave him no end of ribbing for falling for these tricks.
That is hilarious! I vividly remember reading about the sh*t river. I am very pregnant, so I felt like I could smell it just based on the description. So gross.

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Post by randy6175 »

Adedayo+23 wrote:
18 Nov 2019, 08:20
Hester3 wrote:
12 Nov 2019, 14:11
I just started reading the book, but what stood out to me was that the characters did not really care what their shipmates' background was. They would only start to ask personal questions once the first bonds of friendship has already been laid. It is as if the military is a great equalizer, where the only distinction between men is their job title and rank.
Spot on.
Very perceptive. Thank you.

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Post by Nkoo »

What stood out was the friendships that were triggered despite the different backgrounds and personalities that existed among the veterans. Friendships were immediately formed. The sense of unity that bound them together was impressive.

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Post by LyorBoone »

My favorite moment is when one of the beaten marines in the bar gets a kick in the nuts that manages to save his life. The irony still resonates with me. The irony that Americans felt the justifiable need to beat down other Americans to a point that they could easily choke on their own blood, and the more direct irony of a prostitute showing her disdain for the man who had stolen from her who ends up saving his life because unconscious pain makes him turn over to a better breathing position.
“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme” - Mark Twain. Dare we say the same thing about every story that gets told in the world?

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Post by LinaMueller »

Howlan wrote:
01 Nov 2019, 09:04
One of the things that fascinate me are war stories and the bonds that grow among soldiers. In Deadly Waters, right from the beginning we get a whole lot of colorful characters - the Chief, Captain Foley, Quigly, Palmer and the rest. What is your favorite moment ?

Also we get plenty of great stories from these men. Like the one when we get to know how Ensign Wells fears the Chief. What is your favourite ?
I fully agree with you. It's incredible how war can awaken the best and worst in human beings. There are countless examples of terrible atrocities, but there are also innumerable examples of courage and selflessness.
Heart! We will forget him!
You an I, tonight!
You may forget the warmth he gave,
I will forget the light.

When you have done, pray tell me
That I my thoughts may dim;
Haste! lest while you're lagging.
I may remember him!

Emily Dickinson

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Post by Readerjorge »

The military world works like this, with hierarchies, ranks and unquestionable orders and obedience, beyond agreeing or not is the way it works.

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Post by Ekta Swarnkar »

I enjoyed Zach's character the most. I found the character intriguing and his friendship with Eastman was interesting.
You live your dreams in the characters of the books you read. :techie-studyingbrown:

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Post by Kansas City Teacher »

Hester3 wrote:
12 Nov 2019, 14:11
I just started reading the book, but what stood out to me was that the characters did not really care what their shipmates' background was. They would only start to ask personal questions once the first bonds of friendship has already been laid. It is as if the military is a great equalizer, where the only distinction between men is their job title and rank.
Good insight! Brothers in arms first in the military. I think the author did a nice job of describing this, as this is what really happens. Each unit is a cohesive group, and as you said, the rank structure is pretty strict. THe author did a good job of showing this when discussing the NCOs and the LT on the ship.

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Post by randy6175 »

Kansas City Teacher wrote:
06 Dec 2019, 16:18
I like the relationships that are formed between the enlisted men and the descriptions of the relationship between the enlisted, the non commissioned officers and the officers on the ship. I found this to be very realistic. I also liked how they were best buddies while deployed, each one going their separate ways afterwards, but keeping contact for years - also very realistic.
Thank you for your review!

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Post by mishkaat »

Military n specially naval stories attract me a lot and it's perfectly written.

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