There is no "I" in team

Use this forum to discuss the November 2019 Book of the month, "Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath", by Randy Miller.
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Kelyn
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There is no "I" in team

Post by Kelyn »

Having been in the military, I can confidently tell you that there is nothing on earth like the sense of family you will find there. On the flip side of that, however, are the everpresent (usually friendly)) 'competitions' between platoons, occupations within them, and even single individuals. (The ones between individuals were frequently not so friendly!) Each believes that their area/occupation etc. is superior to the others in some way. Push come to shove, though, every last one of them would band together whether it was to help, to defend, or to combat. How is this shown in Deadly Waters?

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Post by Katherine Smith »

I think that this mentality of banding together comes across in the book when dealing with the unforgiving terrain of the Vietnam jungles. When you are in a foreign country it is an adjustment, but fighting in a foreign country is one of the hardest things that you can do. This book reminded me a lot of my uncle who also served in Vietnam in the Army. He and the small group of guys that he was with had each other as company when there weren't any other people in sight.
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Kelyn
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Post by Kelyn »

Katherine Smith wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 12:54
I think that this mentality of banding together comes across in the book when dealing with the unforgiving terrain of the Vietnam jungles. When you are in a foreign country it is an adjustment, but fighting in a foreign country is one of the hardest things that you can do. This book reminded me a lot of my uncle who also served in Vietnam in the Army. He and the small group of guys that he was with had each other as company when there weren't any other people in sight.
Serving in a foreign country is not only an adjustment, but it's also very disorienting. You know nothing or next to nothing of the language, customs, or people. You tend to gravitate to anyone or anything remotely familiar. More often than not, that's going to be the people you serve with. Thanks to your uncle for his service and the hardships that went with it. I'm glad you stopped in to share your thoughts!

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Post by Karina Nowak »

Unfortunately, I have yet to read this book. However, it would be hard for me to believe that anything but a sense of deep camaraderie would develop in a situation like that. Having to rely on each other to survive and for emotional support, would create a real sense of trust between any group of people. I have yet to read a war-themed book that wasn't like you described.

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Kelyn
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Post by Kelyn »

Karina Nowak wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 19:31
Unfortunately, I have yet to read this book. However, it would be hard for me to believe that anything but a sense of deep camaraderie would develop in a situation like that. Having to rely on each other to survive and for emotional support, would create a real sense of trust between any group of people. I have yet to read a war-themed book that wasn't like you described.
Camaraderie is an excellent word for it. I have to say it's the thing I miss the most about being in the military. There's nothing like it anywhere in civilian life, at least that I've ever found. Thanks for stopping in and sharing your thoughts!

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Post by djr6090 »

I want to point out that the camaraderie extends to the military wives. Like the scene where the retired chief and his wife conspire to help the boatswain's apes give payback to the rogue marines.

In real life, the wives were a tight knit crew of their own. Sharing what little info was available about loved ones and helping each other get by in a very unpopular time was essential to the team

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Post by Kelyn »

djr6090 wrote:
04 Nov 2019, 11:36
I want to point out that the camaraderie extends to the military wives. Like the scene where the retired chief and his wife conspire to help the boatswain's apes give payback to the rogue marines.

In real life, the wives were a tight knit crew of their own. Sharing what little info was available about loved ones and helping each other get by in a very unpopular time was essential to the team
Absolutely. Excellent example as well! Living in close quarters in on-base housing does inspire you to get to know and come to depend on one another. I was a military wife, but also a soldier, so it was a little different for me, but I always knew that support was there for me if I should need it. Thanks for dropping in and sharing your thoughts with us!

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Post by aacodreanu »

Kelyn wrote:
01 Nov 2019, 18:18
Having been in the military, I can confidently tell you that there is nothing on earth like the sense of family you will find there. On the flip side of that, however, are the everpresent (usually friendly)) 'competitions' between platoons, occupations within them, and even single individuals. (The ones between individuals were frequently not so friendly!) Each believes that their area/occupation etc. is superior to the others in some way. Push come to shove, though, every last one of them would band together whether it was to help, to defend, or to combat. How is this shown in Deadly Waters?
Your description proves that you are familiar with what happens in war situations among fellow soldiers. It is very impressive. What I do not understand is whether you are asking us to provide answers, or are just criticizing the book. Probably when I read through the book I will know.

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Post by Kansas City Teacher »

Kelyn wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 19:26
Katherine Smith wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 12:54
I think that this mentality of banding together comes across in the book when dealing with the unforgiving terrain of the Vietnam jungles. When you are in a foreign country it is an adjustment, but fighting in a foreign country is one of the hardest things that you can do. This book reminded me a lot of my uncle who also served in Vietnam in the Army. He and the small group of guys that he was with had each other as company when there weren't any other people in sight.
Serving in a foreign country is not only an adjustment, but it's also very disorienting. You know nothing or next to nothing of the language, customs, or people. You tend to gravitate to anyone or anything remotely familiar. More often than not, that's going to be the people you serve with. Thanks to your uncle for his service and the hardships that went with it. I'm glad you stopped in to share your thoughts!
Add to that many of the people do NOT want you there. I have been there - and know that the comraderie we find in the military cannot be matched in any other situation. On the bright side, you do save money when you're deployed. :)

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Post by B Creech »

I know my uncles and my ex-husband made good, close friends during their time in the military. They were all in active duty during the Viet Nam War and there are many things they can, and will share with their military buddies that they can't share with family and civilian friends, even to this day!
B. Creech

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Kelyn
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Post by Kelyn »

B Creech wrote:
12 Nov 2019, 13:16
I know my uncles and my ex-husband made good, close friends during their time in the military. They were all in active duty during the Viet Nam War and there are many things they can, and will share with their military buddies that they can't share with family and civilian friends, even to this day!
I found the same to be true of my grandfather. He served in WWII and would never talk about it to us, but occasionally, when he had a friend or two over from his unit, I would overhear them talking about it in hushed tones. (I was a very sneaky child. LOL) Not even my grandmother was present in the living room during these 'sessions' with his war buddies. You could tell that the friendships and bonds they had formed during their time together in the trenches remained strong even as they grew older.

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Post by Wamakima »

I think that it's amazing how deep bonds are formed in the military. To know that someone has put your interests before his is inspiring. The competitions are bound to happen because as you said everyone is aiming to be the best team in all of the other teams.
But the path I’ve chosen has always been the right one, and I wouldn’t have had it any other way. :)

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Post by Herbstlicht »

It's true deep bonds form in times of adversity. I've read a few military novels and see this development often. However, I feel that the aftermath of war and what becomes of the "I" from the team is often neglected. By that I mean what happens when war is over, and how everyone is expected to continue their lives when they return home. Zach from this novel returned a stronger person, but I dare say most fall through the cracks.

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Post by Beatus »

My father was in the military. He used to tell me and my siblings that when there is danger, automatically anyone against it is your next of kin at that moment.

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Post by rumik »

Being in a situation like that in an unfamiliar country, one would definitely bond strongly with others. I also like the word 'camaraderie' another user here used to describe it.

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