There is no "I" in team

Use this forum to discuss the November 2019 Book of the month, "Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath", by Randy Miller.
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djr6090
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Re: There is no "I" in team

Post by djr6090 »

Kelyn wrote:
19 Nov 2019, 23:18
djr6090 wrote:
17 Nov 2019, 10:14
A very deep bond is shown when Bill Holmann, "the Professor" and his whole family from the West coast flew across the USA to go to Zach and Tally's wedding. Then again to support Zach when he was sick. A very tight bond.
Good point. The bonds formed between them would have had to be quite strong to lead them across the country - twice - to support Zach and Tally. In my experience, outside of family and perhaps very close friendships, in the service is the only place I have felt that sense of 'family' for those who were not actually kin to me.
You know, Keyln, maybe that's why I was so touched by Zach's story. Early in the book he got to feel like military family. I hadn't realized it until now.

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Post by Nuel Ukah »

Katherine Smith wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 12:54
I think that this mentality of banding together comes across in the book when dealing with the unforgiving terrain of the Vietnam jungles. When you are in a foreign country it is an adjustment, but fighting in a foreign country is one of the hardest things that you can do. This book reminded me a lot of my uncle who also served in Vietnam in the Army. He and the small group of guys that he was with had each other as company when there weren't any other people in sight.
I like how you explained it. Sometimes I wonder why forces go to another country to fight. Why?

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Post by Prisallen »

Kelyn wrote:
12 Nov 2019, 17:51
B Creech wrote:
12 Nov 2019, 13:16
I know my uncles and my ex-husband made good, close friends during their time in the military. They were all in active duty during the Viet Nam War and there are many things they can, and will share with their military buddies that they can't share with family and civilian friends, even to this day!
I found the same to be true of my grandfather. He served in WWII and would never talk about it to us, but occasionally, when he had a friend or two over from his unit, I would overhear them talking about it in hushed tones. (I was a very sneaky child. LOL) Not even my grandmother was present in the living room during these 'sessions' with his war buddies. You could tell that the friendships and bonds they had formed during their time together in the trenches remained strong even as they grew older.
My brother was in Vietnam, and like Zack, he would wake up screaming at night; but he also won't talk about it with the family.

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Kelyn
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Post by Kelyn »

Samy Lax wrote:
19 Nov 2019, 02:23
I have not fully read this book yet. Nevertheless, when a group of people train together to fight for a common cause, I am sure it just gets them really close to each other. I have heard about people who served in the military who are more comfortable with those they were in active duty with than they are with other friends back home and family.
It can and most often does except for the inevitable clash of personalities within any group living in close quarters. One of the reasons (I've found) that the phenomenon of being more comfortable with those you served with than your own family and friends is that they know what you've been through. They were there and lived it too. There is no need to explain or go into detail about things that happened and how it felt and still feels. And again, you see that unbreakable bond of brotherhood.

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Post by Kelyn »

BookPower9 wrote:
19 Nov 2019, 21:38
My father is a reserved military. He became commandant in CAT. One thing that I've learned he is disciplined. Camaraderie is a word for Military. But in Business it is called Team. Both described true character of a person. In any organization it was very valuable.
Yes, both camaraderie and the concept of "team" are similar, and both are very valuable. I don't know, though, that either of these terms describes (or even can describe) the 'true character' of a person. Though both of these terms encompass, to some extent, the way one interacts with others, such as family or those you train or work with, an individual's character is shaped by many factors, not these two alone. I feel that it shines through most in the 'heat of the moment," in those split-second decisions, where someone of a differing character could have chosen the exact opposite of what you would. I don't think any single term or concept can fully describe a person's character. Thanks for dropping by and sharing your thoughts with us!

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Post by Everydayadventure15 »

I enjoyed the relationships between Howell and Zach as well as the friendship Zach developed with The Professor (Bill). The way they supported each other through Zach’s cancer ordeal was emotional and I loved how loyal they were to each other and their families.

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Post by Kelyn »

Everydayadventure15 wrote:
22 Nov 2019, 08:33
I enjoyed the relationships between Howell and Zach as well as the friendship Zach developed with The Professor (Bill). The way they supported each other through Zach’s cancer ordeal was emotional and I loved how loyal they were to each other and their families.
Loyalty to one's fellow service members is something that seems to come naturally when you're in the service. Or at least it seemed so to me. It's a microcosm within itself where supporting one another is just part and parcel of life, just like Zach's relationships with the Professor and Howell.

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Post by ciecheesemeister »

My brother was briefly in the Army. He received an honorable medical discharge because of his asthma. He echoed your sentiments. He eventually ended up becoming a firefighter and paramedic and similar bonds tend to form between people in these professions.

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Post by aolayide »

djr6090 wrote:
04 Nov 2019, 11:36
I want to point out that the camaraderie extends to the military wives. Like the scene where the retired chief and his wife conspire to help the boatswain's apes give payback to the rogue marines.

In real life, the wives were a tight knit crew of their own. Sharing what little info was available about loved ones and helping each other get by in a very unpopular time was essential to the team
Yeah, I think the scenario you just painted is a very popular one amongst military wives.

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Post by Kelyn »

ciecheesemeister wrote:
24 Nov 2019, 12:18
My brother was briefly in the Army. He received an honorable medical discharge because of his asthma. He echoed your sentiments. He eventually ended up becoming a firefighter and paramedic and similar bonds tend to form between people in these professions.
I'm not surprised at that. Those are professions which, like the military, require that you can depend on the person behind, beside, and in front of you. Working together as a team like that tends to quickly form friendships and tighten the bonds between all individuals in the group. It's a sense of being able to depend on each other unreservedly. Thanks for stopping in and sharing your thoughts!

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Post by jeminah28 »

Kelyn wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 19:35
Karina Nowak wrote:
03 Nov 2019, 19:31
Unfortunately, I have yet to read this book. However, it would be hard for me to believe that anything but a sense of deep camaraderie would develop in a situation like that. Having to rely on each other to survive and for emotional support, would create a real sense of trust between any group of people. I have yet to read a war-themed book that wasn't like you described.
Camaraderie is an excellent word for it. I have to say it's the thing I miss the most about being in the military. There's nothing like it anywhere in civilian life, at least that I've ever found. Thanks for stopping in and sharing your thoughts!
Exactly! Camaraderie is the only way for them to associate with others. Building rapport with someone you don't know is not easy. Camaraderie bonds many things, including their likes, deslikes, backgrounds and common hobbies.
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Post by ernest mwangemi »

Military situations lead to even stronger bond among the soldiers which eliminates the “i” and makes it we.

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Post by jeminah28 »

ernest mwangemi wrote:
27 Nov 2019, 12:24
Military situations lead to even stronger bond among the soldiers which eliminates the “i” and makes it we.
You cannot make a good team by just yourself. You are right, 'we' is the last choice they have. If one of them, use 'I', coordination is divided.
"Jesus Christ is the Saviour of the world."

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Post by AvidBibliophile »

Having been a military spouse years ago, I experienced firsthand what so many soldiers and families go through, especially during deployments. The animosity and critical judgments between ranks, branches, and even MOS codes is certainly palpable at times, but I think the true camaraderie is steadfast and omnipresent. It was nice to read how even new recruits or men coming aboard for the first time were assisted by those with more experience in learning the ship's layout and everyday routine. Wartime maneuvers (and VA involvement after-the-fact) certainly require a "team approach" for maximum effectiveness.

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Post by AntoineOMEGA »

I think in any war a group of soldiers has to learn to work with each other because if they do not then they could put each other and themselves at risk.

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