There is no "I" in team

Use this forum to discuss the November 2019 Book of the month, "Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath", by Randy Miller.
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Re: There is no "I" in team

Post by rssllue »

Being a team is often required for us throughout life to effectively get anything accomplished in any real productive way. This is especially critical in situations where we are talking about first responders, or in this case, the military. When conflicts arise in these dynamics that remain unresolved it can and often will lead to disaster for the entire "team". Selfishness is like playing with matches around dynamite in situations such as this. Watch out for the boom!
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Post by wordslinger42 »

I think we definitely saw the rivalry between the Navy and the Marines, which I knew nothing about. It was kind of incredible to me that there could be such animosity on one hand, and on the other, such camaraderie between the men who served together on the ship. As an outsider to the military, I would have thought that rivalries would diminish in some respects because they're all fighting against a common enemy, but I guess not!

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Post by Kelyn »

jeminah28 wrote:
27 Nov 2019, 18:25
You cannot make a good team by just yourself. You are right, 'we' is the last choice they have. If one of them, use 'I', coordination is divided.
ernest mwangemi wrote:
27 Nov 2019, 12:24
Military situations lead to even stronger bond among the soldiers which eliminates the “i” and makes it we.
AntoineOMEGA wrote:
28 Nov 2019, 20:40
I think in any war a group of soldiers has to learn to work with each other because if they do not then they could put each other and themselves at risk.
Yes, working together in a military situation, especially combat, does tend to lead to strong bonds forming. In my experience, it wasn't even a matter of having to 'learn' to work together or 'make' it happen; it just naturally formed. Of course, there will always be the one or two who refuse even to try to be team players, and that puts everyone at risk. Thank you all for dropping in and sharing your thoughts!

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Post by Kelyn »

AvidBibliophile wrote:
28 Nov 2019, 14:51
Having been a military spouse years ago, I experienced firsthand what so many soldiers and families go through, especially during deployments. The animosity and critical judgments between ranks, branches, and even MOS codes is certainly palpable at times, but I think the true camaraderie is steadfast and omnipresent. It was nice to read how even new recruits or men coming aboard for the first time were assisted by those with more experience in learning the ship's layout and everyday routine. Wartime maneuvers (and VA involvement after-the-fact) certainly require a "team approach" for maximum effectiveness.
I was 'lucky' enough to get deployed with my (then) husband, so even though we were in different specialties and units, we were able to arrange to see each other far more than most spouses during deployments. Even there, a continent away, the 'spats' between units, ranks, etc. were present. But, as you said, the camaraderie and steadfast support was an overarching presence. I was surprised and pleased at how well the author was able to convey that sense of camaraderie and support in the book. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

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Post by randy6175 »

Kelyn wrote:
01 Dec 2019, 00:04
AvidBibliophile wrote:
28 Nov 2019, 14:51
Having been a military spouse years ago, I experienced firsthand what so many soldiers and families go through, especially during deployments. The animosity and critical judgments between ranks, branches, and even MOS codes is certainly palpable at times, but I think the true camaraderie is steadfast and omnipresent. It was nice to read how even new recruits or men coming aboard for the first time were assisted by those with more experience in learning the ship's layout and everyday routine. Wartime maneuvers (and VA involvement after-the-fact) certainly require a "team approach" for maximum effectiveness.
I was 'lucky' enough to get deployed with my (then) husband, so even though we were in different specialties and units, we were able to arrange to see each other far more than most spouses during deployments. Even there, a continent away, the 'spats' between units, ranks, etc. were present. But, as you said, the camaraderie and steadfast support was an overarching presence. I was surprised and pleased at how well the author was able to convey that sense of camaraderie and support in the book. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!
With respect, thank you.

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Post by jeminah28 »


Yes, working together in a military situation, especially combat, does tend to lead to strong bonds forming. In my experience, it wasn't even a matter of having to 'learn' to work together or 'make' it happen; it just naturally formed. Of course, there will always be the one or two who refuse even to try to be team players, and that puts everyone at risk. Thank you all for dropping in and sharing your thoughts!
I'm glad that you share your experiences. I am proud of you. How I wish to be in the military services, sad to say, I am not capable of doing the job. I salute to all of you, guys.
"Jesus Christ is the Saviour of the world."

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Post by Wyland »

It's a morale booster when soldiers have something to share with each other. The culture of messing for example is powerful and a chance for soldiers of each rank to develop a group identity.

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Post by Kelyn »

Wyland wrote:
04 Dec 2019, 07:26
It's a morale booster when soldiers have something to share with each other. The culture of messing for example is powerful and a chance for soldiers of each rank to develop a group identity.
So true! Not only is it a time to strengthen the bonds that have been or are forming, but to begin to form new ones. And you're correct, it does seem to form rank-based groupings. Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

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Post by bb587 »

The bond that comes from serving your country is something everyone can observe. I've seen veterans who are generally introverts bloom upon meeting another veteran. It's like they automatically know, "Here is a person I can relate to even though we've never met before. This is my brother/sister." To write a book without that connection would be disingenuous.

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Post by Nkoo »

When one finds one's self in unfamiliar and foreign terrain, they can only adjust; this adjustment will lead them to doing the best they can as well as making the best of what they have. This lifeskill is evident in Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath.

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Post by Kelyn »

bb587 wrote:
06 Dec 2019, 08:16
The bond that comes from serving your country is something everyone can observe. I've seen veterans who are generally introverts bloom upon meeting another veteran. It's like they automatically know, "Here is a person I can relate to even though we've never met before. This is my brother/sister." To write a book without that connection would be disingenuous.
I agree that these bonds between veterans can definitely be observed, but I'm not so sure that it comes merely from the similarity of simply 'serving one's country." As you indicate, it goes deeper than that. There's that almost instinctual knowledge that you've met someone akin to you. And yes, to write a book concerning war without including that aspect would indeed be leaving out a significant occurrence between servicemen and women. Thanks so much for stopping in and sharing your thoughts with us!

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Post by Kelyn »

Nkoo wrote:
06 Dec 2019, 13:06
When one finds one's self in unfamiliar and foreign terrain, they can only adjust; this adjustment will lead them to doing the best they can as well as making the best of what they have. This lifeskill is evident in Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath.
I agree with both of your statements. Still, I am not certain how you mean "adjustment" in relation to the feeling of camaraderie and family found in military and combat situations. I also agree that these are certainly lifeskills seen in Deadly Waters. I would love to hear your thoughts on how this relates to the wording of your statements. Thanks for dropping by. I hope to hear from you again!

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Post by Clorinda Donovan »

rumik wrote:
13 Nov 2019, 09:27
Being in a situation like that in an unfamiliar country, one would definitely bond strongly with others. I also like the word 'camaraderie' another user here used to describe it.
Well said. I would say it is like the saying goes "the enemy of my enemy is my friend".
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Post by Kanda_theGreat »

At the end of the day, we always want to talk to people that would be emphatic to us. People that share in our fears, our hopes, our desires; we always want to bond with those who will write down the lyrics of our sings when we can't sing. Entry into and exit from barracks forge bonds so tight that are next to family. The fact that the victory and loss is OURS in equal measure strengthens this bond, that every soldier always has the other's back.
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Post by Nickolas Farmakis »

I agree with you on that. I think a team spirit is vital in the military, but unfortunately there is also competition between soldiers. I think this is shown by the numerous fights Zack takes part in, where the Marines and the Navy fight against each other.

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