There is no "I" in team

Use this forum to discuss the November 2019 Book of the month, "Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath", by Randy Miller.
Nickolas Farmakis
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Re: There is no "I" in team

Post by Nickolas Farmakis »

I was horrified by the scene where the Marine almost bit Zack's thumb off because as a soldier of the same country you should support your fellow soldier, not cause him trouble. I think this portrays the fierce competition in the army, and that in many cases there is no team spirit.

randy6175
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Post by randy6175 »

Nickolas Farmakis wrote:
23 Dec 2019, 07:41
I was horrified by the scene where the Marine almost bit Zack's thumb off because as a soldier of the same country you should support your fellow soldier, not cause him trouble. I think this portrays the fierce competition in the army, and that in many cases there is no team spirit.
It was not a marine that was attempting to bite Zack's thumb off, but another sailor.

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Post by Tehreem000 »

Kelyn wrote:
01 Nov 2019, 18:18
Having been in the military, I can confidently tell you that there is nothing on earth like the sense of family you will find there. On the flip side of that, however, are the everpresent (usually friendly)) 'competitions' between platoons, occupations within them, and even single individuals. (The ones between individuals were frequently not so friendly!) Each believes that their area/occupation etc. is superior to the others in some way. Push come to shove, though, every last one of them would band together whether it was to help, to defend, or to combat. How is this shown in Deadly Waters?
I haven't read the book yet, but those who have are all praises for it. The concept of comradery is sure to prevail in any book on military or war. I hope it is there.

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Post by Edgeona »

This is an interesting book to read,from the review it worth reading...Thumbs up Author

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Post by roymutuma »

I think the crew accommodated for each others weaknesses perfectly. It would be fair to say that the protagonist's survival relied, at least to a certain extent, on Daniel's leadership and organizational skills. More so, I think the most important thing to the fighter's soul was the sense of family that their comradeship offered. Being so far away from home and anything remotely familiar is so devastating. However, with the company of friends, I bet they become family in their own right. Overall, I'd love to read about experiences like this especially from the honourable heroes who have had first-hand experiences in this matter.

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Kelyn
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Post by Kelyn »

Kanda_theGreat wrote:
21 Dec 2019, 21:50
At the end of the day, we always want to talk to people that would be emphatic to us. People that share in our fears, our hopes, our desires; we always want to bond with those who will write down the lyrics of our sings when we can't sing. Entry into and exit from barracks forge bonds so tight that are next to family. The fact that the victory and loss is OURS in equal measure strengthens this bond, that every soldier always has the other's back.
I think your last statement sums up the camaraderie I mentioned. It means a lot knowing that everyone around you has your back, even when everyday squabbles and competitions are the norms. It's an indescribable feeling to know, without a doubt, that if the need arises, everyone will rally together. Thanks for stopping in and sharing your thoughts!

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Post by randy6175 »

roymutuma wrote:
04 Jan 2020, 04:20
I think the crew accommodated for each others weaknesses perfectly. It would be fair to say that the protagonist's survival relied, at least to a certain extent, on Daniel's leadership and organizational skills. More so, I think the most important thing to the fighter's soul was the sense of family that their comradeship offered. Being so far away from home and anything remotely familiar is so devastating. However, with the company of friends, I bet they become family in their own right. Overall, I'd love to read about experiences like this especially from the honourable heroes who have had first-hand experiences in this matter.
Hmm. Are you talking about Deadly Waters? There is no character in it named Daniel.

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Post by Agnes Masobeng »

A lot of people in the military or who were in the military will agree that indeed there's no I in a team. If by chance a lion attacks, and there are humans around who are probably strangers, they'll be forced to work together against the lion.
Death And Destruction Are Never Satisfied And Neither Are Human Eyes...Proverbs 27: 20

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Post by Saraion »

Teamwork is often necessary in life. It is especially important in the army and among soldiers. Coordination is a requirement of an army. However, in some areas this has been overlooked.

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Post by Melchi Asuma »

All war stories I have read, including the bit I have read on Deadly Waters, portray the army as a family. Like all families, members will fight but it does not lessen the bond but rather strengthens it.
MA

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Post by Kelyn »

Agnes Masobeng wrote:
05 Jan 2020, 10:18
A lot of people in the military or who were in the military will agree that indeed there's no I in a team. If by chance a lion attacks, and there are humans around who are probably strangers, they'll be forced to work together against the lion.
That's an interesting analogy and very fitting for combat situations. The people you're fighting against, for whatever reason, would be considered the 'lions' everyone must unite to defeat, whether they know each other well or not. All are threatened, all pitch in to meet the threat. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts with us!

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Post by Kelyn »

Saraion wrote:
13 Jan 2020, 00:59
Teamwork is often necessary in life. It is especially important in the army and among soldiers. Coordination is a requirement of an army. However, in some areas this has been overlooked.
In civilian life, for some reason, that coordination is much more difficult to achieve. Being in the military begets this sense of overall cooperation or coordination. At least it did to me. I would be interested to know in what areas of the military you feel this has been overlooked. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts with us!

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Post by hmorgan90 »

So Mt very limited experience with anything military was one year in my high school AFJROTC. I am so spent sometime around military bases in Virginia and North Carolina and made good friends in the Navy and Air Force. What I learned from my Navy friends was this, you are on a ship for however long and there are people who will not like you for whatever reason. You don't have to like them but you do have to work with them. Zack was lucky the only people he didn't get a long with were those jarheads. I was able to understand what Randy Miller was trying to tell in the story about how the two branches didn't get along very well. Or still don't. I'm not sure if there is still rivalries between any of the branches of military or not.
May we show increased kindness toward one another. ~Thomas S. Monson
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Post by Kelyn »

hmorgan90 wrote:
15 Jan 2020, 12:30
So Mt very limited experience with anything military was one year in my high school AFJROTC. I am so spent sometime around military bases in Virginia and North Carolina and made good friends in the Navy and Air Force. What I learned from my Navy friends was this, you are on a ship for however long and there are people who will not like you for whatever reason. You don't have to like them but you do have to work with them. Zack was lucky the only people he didn't get a long with were those jarheads. I was able to understand what Randy Miller was trying to tell in the story about how the two branches didn't get along very well. Or still don't. I'm not sure if there is still rivalries between any of the branches of military or not.
Although my stint in the military was many years ago, I have absolutely no doubt that rivalries, friendly and otherwise, still exist between the branches of the military and always will. Obviously, each wants to be seen as the 'best and brightest' and are not so great at sharing that title. Your friend was absolutely right in what he said. It's actually one of the things we were outright taught. You don't have to like each other or be best buddies, but you do have to have a civil working relationship, period. You're not going to form a significant and lasting bond with everyone around you, but you are all in it together nevertheless. Thanks for stopping in and sharing your thoughts with us!

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Post by Daniel_ »

Saraion wrote:
13 Jan 2020, 00:59
Teamwork is often necessary in life. It is especially important in the army and among soldiers. Coordination is a requirement of an army. However, in some areas this has been overlooked.
Though I have not read this book, I must say that truly there is no "I" in team. Teamwork doesn't give room for selfishness or self-glory, and if there is anything I admire in the army, it is their team spirit.

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