Most memorable maritime descriptive phrases?

Use this forum to discuss the November 2019 Book of the month, "Deadly Waters: The Vietnam Naval War And Its Aftermath", by Randy Miller.
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AvidBibliophile
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Re: Most memorable maritime descriptive phrases?

Post by AvidBibliophile »

Kanda_theGreat wrote:
21 Dec 2019, 21:26
The use of vivid description enhanced the author's message and drove the point home. Zack's first time in the ship is described in a way that made me create mental pictures of bars of soap arranged in a carton. The fact that the men didn't have enough space to sleep also laid more focus on the sole purpose of the voyage.
I felt equally-entranced by the constructed imagery! Just imagine what it must have been like to step aboard for the first time... to truly absorb the jaw-dropping realities presented by your floating workplace and newest place of residence. Mission over comfort, cost-effective practicality over all else.

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Post by LinaMueller »

AvidBibliophile wrote:
29 Nov 2019, 15:39
I also loved the poetic flow of this quote about how the villagers would find a way to profit from the free-loading rodents who'd come to feast upon their rice paddies...
It was an ideal situation: carbohydrates from rice, protein from rats, and pesos from sailors from the surplus of both.
"protein from rats" lol what a fantastic quote :lol2:
Heart! We will forget him!
You an I, tonight!
You may forget the warmth he gave,
I will forget the light.

When you have done, pray tell me
That I my thoughts may dim;
Haste! lest while you're lagging.
I may remember him!

Emily Dickinson

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Ketbax
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Post by Ketbax »

I specifically highlighted "The Navy calls those sailors 'Lost at Sea,' but they're not lost. They're dead. All we can do now is pray for them."

I think this perfectly outlines the finality these soldiers were dealing with. Each day was life or death, and all they could do was pray they are in a better place. It also shows just how helpless they felt on those ships.

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Post by AvidBibliophile »

Ketbax wrote:
23 Dec 2019, 12:08
I specifically highlighted "The Navy calls those sailors 'Lost at Sea,' but they're not lost. They're dead. All we can do now is pray for them."
I think this perfectly outlines the finality these soldiers were dealing with. Each day was life or death, and all they could do was pray they are in a better place. It also shows just how helpless they felt on those ships.
Most definitely, such a moving statement for sure. A label of that caliber provides a reverence like no other; a sentiment of reality that only other sailors and soldiers can truly understand.

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