Carly and Dauma's Relationship

Use this forum to discuss the February 2020 Book of the month, "Opaque" by Calix Leigh-Reign
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Re: Carly and Dauma's Relationship

Post by diamonnd »

cristinaro wrote: 15 Feb 2020, 04:41 I could resonate with Dauma's decision if I accept her own explanation, that she could not live without her half. However, I don't think her action was an act of self-sacrifice. On the contrary, I would say that she abandoned her daughter when she needed her most.
I absolutely agree! Dauma did lose her husband, but Carly had also just lost her father. I felt that it was selfish of Dauma to do that, because now Carly had 'lost' her mother as well and that is a lot for any person to handle, especially a teenager.
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Post by diamonnd »

nfdoughe wrote: 14 Feb 2020, 11:38 I think we still don't have all the facts on the implications of their merger. Dauma is supposedly this genius so I wouldn't assume she's done anything stupid. I do think it partly had something to do with her husband's death since she said it was painful to be without him. It's also something of their family tradition as she mentions her father merging with his mother and also merging with her. I thought it was an interesting part of the story. The consequences are probably not fully apparent yet.
You're right! I'm interested to see what comes from this merger in the next book! With that way this book went, I'm sure that it'll be something surprising and unexpected.
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Post by diamonnd »

Nym182 wrote: 15 Feb 2020, 13:10
nfdoughe wrote: 14 Feb 2020, 11:38 I think we still don't have all the facts on the implications of their merger. Dauma is supposedly this genius so I wouldn't assume she's done anything stupid. I do think it partly had something to do with her husband's death since she said it was painful to be without him. It's also something of their family tradition as she mentions her father merging with his mother and also merging with her. I thought it was an interesting part of the story. The consequences are probably not fully apparent yet.
That is one thing I do find compelling about the merger... There has got to be at least some negative consequence from such a drastic move!
Interesting! I hadn't considered the possibility of negative consequences, but that is certainly something to keep in mind for the next book. I'm interested to see how Carly deals with the aftermath of this merger.
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Post by mishkaat »

the love and respect of carley for her mother is superb I like their relationship.
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KDJ wrote: 02 Feb 2020, 17:34 I kind of think that all mothers would do that. In this particular situation, she was also so distraught over her husband's murder that I think when she used too much energy to kill the militants, she may have been trying to commit suicide. That's just what I think. What better way to leave your daughter with generations of insight and power, so she can continue to fight the Iksha.
I completely agree with the perspective of maternal self-sacrifice being the ultimate gift of ongoing life for your child, but this particular instance reiterates that perhaps no one is in the right headspace to make life and death decisions when they are already feeling grief-stricken and distraught; that emotional-complicator certainly made the motives more fuzzy.
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Post by Howlan »

diamonnd wrote: 18 Feb 2020, 01:37
Browlyns wrote: 16 Feb 2020, 17:38 You must remember that Dauma had lived for three hundred years hence, she was weakening, the only option was for her to empower her daughter as preparation for what was to come.
I agree that it was a necessary action, however the concept of becoming one felt very sudden and it wasn't fair to Carly to have that thrust upon her so suddenly without any chance of discussion or having questions answered.
Yes, she should have been there for Carly. She gave up when Carly needed her the most.
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Post by Howlan »

diamonnd wrote: 18 Feb 2020, 01:43
nfdoughe wrote: 14 Feb 2020, 11:38 I think we still don't have all the facts on the implications of their merger. Dauma is supposedly this genius so I wouldn't assume she's done anything stupid. I do think it partly had something to do with her husband's death since she said it was painful to be without him. It's also something of their family tradition as she mentions her father merging with his mother and also merging with her. I thought it was an interesting part of the story. The consequences are probably not fully apparent yet.
You're right! I'm interested to see what comes from this merger in the next book! With that way this book went, I'm sure that it'll be something surprising and unexpected.
Other than being more powerful, I think it will cause Carly emotional trouble as well.
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Post by Howlan »

mishkaat wrote: 19 Feb 2020, 15:20 the love and respect of carley for her mother is superb I like their relationship.
Yes Carly definitely loved and respested her mother. I feel that her mother was also proud and fond of her daughter.
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AvidBibliophile wrote: 19 Feb 2020, 23:32
KDJ wrote: 02 Feb 2020, 17:34 I kind of think that all mothers would do that. In this particular situation, she was also so distraught over her husband's murder that I think when she used too much energy to kill the militants, she may have been trying to commit suicide. That's just what I think. What better way to leave your daughter with generations of insight and power, so she can continue to fight the Iksha.
I completely agree with the perspective of maternal self-sacrifice being the ultimate gift of ongoing life for your child, but this particular instance reiterates that perhaps no one is in the right headspace to make life and death decisions when they are already feeling grief-stricken and distraught; that emotional-complicator certainly made the motives more fuzzy.
Exactly! There is a reason why people are not encouraged to make big decisions after a shocking development in their lives. Acting on raw emotion can be dangerous.
Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!” HST
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Post by Howlan »

Nym182 wrote: 20 Feb 2020, 11:19
AvidBibliophile wrote: 19 Feb 2020, 23:32
KDJ wrote: 02 Feb 2020, 17:34 I kind of think that all mothers would do that. In this particular situation, she was also so distraught over her husband's murder that I think when she used too much energy to kill the militants, she may have been trying to commit suicide. That's just what I think. What better way to leave your daughter with generations of insight and power, so she can continue to fight the Iksha.
I completely agree with the perspective of maternal self-sacrifice being the ultimate gift of ongoing life for your child, but this particular instance reiterates that perhaps no one is in the right headspace to make life and death decisions when they are already feeling grief-stricken and distraught; that emotional-complicator certainly made the motives more fuzzy.
Exactly! There is a reason why people are not encouraged to make big decisions after a shocking development in their lives. Acting on raw emotion can be dangerous.
Yes, I agree with what you are saying. She needed to be there for her daughter in times of crisis the descendants are facing. Considering her experience, she should have made a better decision not guided by the grief of losing her husband.
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Post by diamonnd »

Howlan wrote: 20 Feb 2020, 11:13
diamonnd wrote: 18 Feb 2020, 01:43
nfdoughe wrote: 14 Feb 2020, 11:38 I think we still don't have all the facts on the implications of their merger. Dauma is supposedly this genius so I wouldn't assume she's done anything stupid. I do think it partly had something to do with her husband's death since she said it was painful to be without him. It's also something of their family tradition as she mentions her father merging with his mother and also merging with her. I thought it was an interesting part of the story. The consequences are probably not fully apparent yet.
You're right! I'm interested to see what comes from this merger in the next book! With that way this book went, I'm sure that it'll be something surprising and unexpected.
Other than being more powerful, I think it will cause Carly emotional trouble as well.
I didn't think of it that way! You're right. I wonder if her connection with Dauma's powers will cause her to have emotional flashbacks of memories with her mother. I'm eager to see how she handles it.
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Post by Howlan »

diamonnd wrote: 20 Feb 2020, 23:19
Howlan wrote: 20 Feb 2020, 11:13
diamonnd wrote: 18 Feb 2020, 01:43

You're right! I'm interested to see what comes from this merger in the next book! With that way this book went, I'm sure that it'll be something surprising and unexpected.
Other than being more powerful, I think it will cause Carly emotional trouble as well.
I didn't think of it that way! You're right. I wonder if her connection with Dauma's powers will cause her to have emotional flashbacks of memories with her mother. I'm eager to see how she handles it.
Yes, and if we consider it that way I feel that she might have some trouble from her grandfather's memories as well.
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Post by Jacktone Ogada »

It was a very strong daughter-mother relationship and I feel sorry for Carly that she lost her in the end.
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Post by Rwill0988 »

DragonLight877 wrote: 02 Feb 2020, 22:14 I liked their relationship, up to the point where they became one. I thought it was an alright concept, but it really felt like Dauma was just giving up. It seemed like after losing her husband, Dauma wouldn't even continue to be there for her 16 year old daughter, who still really needed her. Over-all, there relationship was a very powerful one, but I wish it didn't just feel like Dauma abandoning her because of the loss of her husband.

This is exactly the way I read this part of the book. It seemed almost cruel as Carly begs her mother to stay because she couldn't lose both parents. Her mother's decision to force it on it didn't fit with the dynamic I thought they had.
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Post by Arimart99 »

I loved Carly and Dauma's relationship, but to say that Dauma sacrificed herself solely for Carly is wrong. I do think that it played a role, but I feel like it was mostly because she felt like she could no longer live without her husband, which is a pretty selfish thing to do since her 16 year old daughter still really needed her.
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