Three phases of a Life of a Christian

Use this forum to discuss the May 2020 Book of the month, "Grace Revealed: Finding God's Strength in Any Crisis" by Frederick J. Sievert.
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Amesthenerd
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Re: Three phases of a Life of a Christian

Post by Amesthenerd »

Sushan wrote:
07 Jun 2020, 20:12
Amesthenerd wrote:
07 Jun 2020, 17:24
I feel like this cycle can also be true in life of people who are not Christian. People extend grace as well. I just had someone buy me groceries because I could not and it made me want to give back because I felt so blessed by it.
You don't have to belong to any religion to go through these phases, and you can interpret them in your own manner
Well said

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Post by TeachinTeens »

Sushan wrote:
02 May 2020, 22:36
According to the author, there are three phases in the life of a Christian; Facing a crisis, Receiving grace, and returning grace to others.

What is your opinion about this? Have you ever done it? Is it practical?
I feel this is an oversimplification. I think these phrases may come in any order, which means we might not always find ourselves first facing a crisis. I grew up in a Christian home; every Christmas, my grandmother would gift me a religious book. Had it been written in my childhood, I feel confident "Grace Revealed" would have found its way into the gift bag. Therefore, the concept of giving grace to others was simply a part of how I was raised to behave. Before reaching that age of accountability, my morality and behavioral patterns were built around this concept of showing God's grace in every action; there was no crisis to spur me. After reading "Grace Revealed", I think any crisis I faced even later in life would have to be considered minor at this point in comparison anyways. Christians are flawed people living in a flawed world, so there are constant crisis. There is also constant grace, and the constant intent to do right by others (if they truly do mirror Jesus).

Therefore, I don't see these 3 phases as being that of the development of a Christian. Things can be going great, such as they were for the lawyer in "Grace Revealed", and it still isn't enough without God. Things can be going horribly, as they were for the soldier in Vietnam, but he was still paying the grace forward without knowing until years later why his actions were important. While I think all Christians might experience each of these, I don't think they always go in this same cycle. They ebb and flow.

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Sushan
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Post by Sushan »

TeachinTeens wrote:
08 Jun 2020, 00:31
Sushan wrote:
02 May 2020, 22:36
According to the author, there are three phases in the life of a Christian; Facing a crisis, Receiving grace, and returning grace to others.

What is your opinion about this? Have you ever done it? Is it practical?
I feel this is an oversimplification. I think these phrases may come in any order, which means we might not always find ourselves first facing a crisis. I grew up in a Christian home; every Christmas, my grandmother would gift me a religious book. Had it been written in my childhood, I feel confident "Grace Revealed" would have found its way into the gift bag. Therefore, the concept of giving grace to others was simply a part of how I was raised to behave. Before reaching that age of accountability, my morality and behavioral patterns were built around this concept of showing God's grace in every action; there was no crisis to spur me. After reading "Grace Revealed", I think any crisis I faced even later in life would have to be considered minor at this point in comparison anyways. Christians are flawed people living in a flawed world, so there are constant crisis. There is also constant grace, and the constant intent to do right by others (if they truly do mirror Jesus).

Therefore, I don't see these 3 phases as being that of the development of a Christian. Things can be going great, such as they were for the lawyer in "Grace Revealed", and it still isn't enough without God. Things can be going horribly, as they were for the soldier in Vietnam, but he was still paying the grace forward without knowing until years later why his actions were important. While I think all Christians might experience each of these, I don't think they always go in this same cycle. They ebb and flow.
Yes the phases can be mixed in their order, and also the in between time gap can be vary
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Post by Xenolyph »

As a new Christian, it's very strange to adjust to the new life. It is something that takes a step-by-step process. I do feel that the first step is accepting there is a problem or facing what lay before you. Then you have to humble yourself and accept the grace God has before you can proceed.

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Post by Sushan »

Xenolyph wrote:
08 Jun 2020, 19:36
As a new Christian, it's very strange to adjust to the new life. It is something that takes a step-by-step process. I do feel that the first step is accepting there is a problem or facing what lay before you. Then you have to humble yourself and accept the grace God has before you can proceed.
To satrt off you need grace, and you will definitely be provided with it
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Post by Wyzdomania_Gskillz »

I feel this is an oversimplification. I think these phrases may come in any order, which means we might not always find ourselves first facing a crisis. I grew up in a Christian home; every Christmas, my grandmother would gift me a religious book. Had it been written in my childhood, I feel confident "Grace Revealed" would have found its way into the gift bag. Therefore, the concept of giving grace to others was simply a part of how I was raised to behave. Before reaching that age of accountability, my morality and behavioral patterns were built around this concept of showing God's grace in every action; there was no crisis to spur me. After reading "Grace Revealed", I think any crisis I faced even later in life would have to be considered minor at this point in comparison anyways. Christians are flawed people living in a flawed world, so there are constant crisis. There is also constant grace, and the constant intent to do right by others (if they truly do mirror Jesus).

Therefore, I don't see these 3 phases as being that of the development of a Christian. Things can be going great, such as they were for the lawyer in "Grace Revealed", and it still isn't enough without God. Things can be going horribly, as they were for the soldier in Vietnam, but he was still paying the grace forward without knowing until years later why his actions were important. While I think all Christians might experience each of these, I don't think they always go in this same cycle. They ebb and flow.

Whilst I agree with you, I do not however think that the author implies that thee phases must go in that exact order in a cycle. They are just a summation of phases that every Christian goes through one time or another in their lives that helps reveal grace, in any order that they come. Recognizing the significance of every phase is what is key

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Sushan
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Post by Sushan »

Wyzdomania_Gskillz wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 05:16
I feel this is an oversimplification. I think these phrases may come in any order, which means we might not always find ourselves first facing a crisis. I grew up in a Christian home; every Christmas, my grandmother would gift me a religious book. Had it been written in my childhood, I feel confident "Grace Revealed" would have found its way into the gift bag. Therefore, the concept of giving grace to others was simply a part of how I was raised to behave. Before reaching that age of accountability, my morality and behavioral patterns were built around this concept of showing God's grace in every action; there was no crisis to spur me. After reading "Grace Revealed", I think any crisis I faced even later in life would have to be considered minor at this point in comparison anyways. Christians are flawed people living in a flawed world, so there are constant crisis. There is also constant grace, and the constant intent to do right by others (if they truly do mirror Jesus).

Therefore, I don't see these 3 phases as being that of the development of a Christian. Things can be going great, such as they were for the lawyer in "Grace Revealed", and it still isn't enough without God. Things can be going horribly, as they were for the soldier in Vietnam, but he was still paying the grace forward without knowing until years later why his actions were important. While I think all Christians might experience each of these, I don't think they always go in this same cycle. They ebb and flow.

Whilst I agree with you, I do not however think that the author implies that thee phases must go in that exact order in a cycle. They are just a summation of phases that every Christian goes through one time or another in their lives that helps reveal grace, in any order that they come. Recognizing the significance of every phase is what is key
That is true. The order might vary. What is important is going through them and sharing grace
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Post by Arwa_here »

I agree that the author presents a specific sequence of the stages of giving and receiving grace. But as everyone interprets a text differently, I think it's the same if someone goes through one phase before the other i.e these are interchangeable.

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Post by Miller56 »

I think we receive God's grace most often when we are in crisis and feel that nothing we do is helping. For many of us raised in church, we have understood and probably received God's grace without a crisis, but we understand that when their is a crisis in our lives we can readily turn to God. Once we receive grace, it is easier for us to give grace to others. So the three steps seem appropriate except I am not sure you have to have a crisis to understand and receive grace.

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Post by Grace Bela »

Overall, I think the three phases work really well for describing a Christian life when experiencing struggle. However, this might not apply to everyone, so I'd hesitate to say it's a perfect description. God's timing in healing, along with how and when he acts isn't the same for everyone. Because a relationship with God is so personal and unique to an individual, there might be other ways to describe it that work equally as well.

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Post by Grace Bela »

Miller56 wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 14:03
I think we receive God's grace most often when we are in crisis and feel that nothing we do is helping. For many of us raised in church, we have understood and probably received God's grace without a crisis, but we understand that when their is a crisis in our lives we can readily turn to God. Once we receive grace, it is easier for us to give grace to others. So the three steps seem appropriate except I am not sure you have to have a crisis to understand and receive grace.
I agree with your interpretation. Just because someone experiences less hardship than another person doesn't mean that they necessarily have less God-given grace. While crisis are one way to draw closer to God and his grace, they aren't the only way.

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Post by Sushan »

Arwa_here wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 11:50
I agree that the author presents a specific sequence of the stages of giving and receiving grace. But as everyone interprets a text differently, I think it's the same if someone goes through one phase before the other i.e these are interchangeable.
Though the author has stated them in a sequence for the purpose of better understanding, yes, they are interchangeable.
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Post by Sushan »

Miller56 wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 14:03
I think we receive God's grace most often when we are in crisis and feel that nothing we do is helping. For many of us raised in church, we have understood and probably received God's grace without a crisis, but we understand that when their is a crisis in our lives we can readily turn to God. Once we receive grace, it is easier for us to give grace to others. So the three steps seem appropriate except I am not sure you have to have a crisis to understand and receive grace.
Crisis is not always necessary to receive grace, but that can be a good stimulant for one to be reminded of grace.
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Post by Sushan »

Grace Bela wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 17:35
Overall, I think the three phases work really well for describing a Christian life when experiencing struggle. However, this might not apply to everyone, so I'd hesitate to say it's a perfect description. God's timing in healing, along with how and when he acts isn't the same for everyone. Because a relationship with God is so personal and unique to an individual, there might be other ways to describe it that work equally as well.
It does not apply to all in same manner or equal quantity, yet it applies to all, the God's grace!
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Sushan
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Post by Sushan »

Grace Bela wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 17:38
Miller56 wrote:
09 Jun 2020, 14:03
I think we receive God's grace most often when we are in crisis and feel that nothing we do is helping. For many of us raised in church, we have understood and probably received God's grace without a crisis, but we understand that when their is a crisis in our lives we can readily turn to God. Once we receive grace, it is easier for us to give grace to others. So the three steps seem appropriate except I am not sure you have to have a crisis to understand and receive grace.
I agree with your interpretation. Just because someone experiences less hardship than another person doesn't mean that they necessarily have less God-given grace. While crisis are one way to draw closer to God and his grace, they aren't the only way.
There are many ways for one to be attracted to the God, and crisis is one of them. Being in a crisis or not His grace is always yours
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