Classic Book Genre Discussion 2020

For June 2020 we'll be reading Classic books.
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hsimone
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Classic Book Genre Discussion 2020

Post by hsimone »

This month we will be reading books that fall under in the classic genre! :techie-studyingbrown:

When thinking of a classic book, it is one that can be considered timeless, noteworthy, outstanding, exemplary, etc.

Sub-genres of classic novels can include:
- historical fiction
- young adult
- romance
- science fiction
- fantasy
- mystery
- so much more!

As we share the classics we've read this month, let's consider the following:
  • What did you read? What year was it published?
  • Was this a new read or re-read for you?
  • Did the story/content hold up even in today’s world?
  • Are there other genres woven into the text?
  • What makes this book a classic?
  • Would you recommend the book you read? Why or why not?
As always, let's have fun this month reading!
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Amanda Newton
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Post by Amanda Newton »

I am so excited to see classic books come up this month. I had already planned to read Dracula, but this seems the perfect month to branch out a bit more into some more classics. I can't wait to see what everyone else is reading and recommending.
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hsimone
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Post by hsimone »

Amanda Newton wrote: 05 Jun 2020, 19:05 I am so excited to see classic books come up this month. I had already planned to read Dracula, but this seems the perfect month to branch out a bit more into some more classics. I can't wait to see what everyone else is reading and recommending.
Glad you're excited! Confession - I've never Dracula, but it's one that I've been interested in reading. One day, I'll read it!
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Post by hsimone »

I recently finished Anne of Green Gables, and it was one that I really enjoyed! To be honest, I only wanted to read it because I really liked the Netflix recent series.

I would consider this to be children/young adult read. It was fun and light-hearted. It's interesting because it was more of a series of short stories/events that Anne experiences versus one continuous story with a clear climax and resolution. I think Anne's imaginative nature would be appealing to some of today's youth. However, I felt the orphan piece of her life was lacking some. What I mean is that I wish there was more background building of her life before the Cuthberts. I think this would help those who have lost their parents and/or went through foster care or lived orphanage might find this to be more relevant. I was also perhaps spoiled from the Netflix series since there was clear trauma in Anne's life in the orphanage that she had flashbacks and it affected some of decisions.

I would say Anne's imagination, her sweet nature, the desire of wanting a "bosom" friend, and finding her way in her new world with the Cuthberts is what makes Anne of Green Gables a classic. I really enjoyed this book and have started reading the second in the series. I would recommend this book to young adults (and young at heart) who enjoy reading about a young girl (who enjoys to talk!), her adapting to her adopted family, and making connections with others.
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Post by Lucille27 »

I have a problem with this definition of classic book, while being at college, we had kind of two definitions:
-Classic books as those who were written by the Greeks and Romans
-Masterpieces from old times (yet this was almost non-used)

I entered this forum with that on mind; nevertheless, I do believe the definition you use of classic is also valid, and helps to create a canon of more readings. Everyone should be able to consider a classic a book which moves something inside oneself. I believe Italo Calvino has an essay on this.

After saying that, I would love to share my reading experience: This month I'm finally reading from beginning to ending A Portrair of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce. Once I finish it, I will try to do the same with his Ulysses. Since last year I've been working with Joyce's text. Last year I entered into a colloquium but with one of his stories from Dubliners. I do believe these pieces enter into the definition of classics. Also, there exists some intertextualities between Joyce's Ulysses and Homer's Odyssey, which is why I am very excited to read this one. For me, these series of Joyce's books are a kind of puzzle that needs to be unravel. It is a demanding reading, but I also enjoy it.

I hope to make an update at the end of the month, so I can share my opinions in a more structured way after reading these books.

Be safe and have good readings.
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Post by aftabyunis »

Wow!!I love the way as people of this community are like minded about classic books. I think one of the best classical book, I have ever read is: "Things Fall Apart" this is actually a novel written by Chinua Achebe, published in 1958. It is a precolonial story of Nigeria, whereby the author of this novel compares the situation of Nigerian before and after Europeans' arrival. It starts with indigenous insights of people whereby people admire local wisdom, and living a happy life. Though it begins with problematic issues, nevertheless because people are using their great ancestors methods to deal with the current crises, thus everything is resolving in a perfect way. However with the passage of time after giving a space to something that is not part of their context takes beauty, unity and local wisdom of that context. In conclusion, the author shows that when they lose what belongs to them, indeed they lose everything.
This is one of the example of reading classic books and I would recommend each one of you to read this book.
As it is very similar with reading the classical books it gives insights to the young ones to know the past challenges to overcome the present challenges. Therefore, neglecting classic books are like neglecting your past that teaches us some good lessons to overcome current crises.
Last edited by aftabyunis on 19 Jun 2020, 13:34, edited 1 time in total.
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