Stephen King Movie Adaptations

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Bighuey
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Post by Bighuey »

I guess I was thinking of something different. There was a horror movie with Jim Carey a few years ago, it seems the title was a hotel room number.

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Mel Carriere
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Post by Mel Carriere »

Vogin wrote:
Bighuey wrote:
Vogin wrote:I wanted to say I saw just The Green Mile, but then it struck me that 1408 was King's work too. I liked both, although obviously The Mile lies on the very top of all book-to-movie adaptations ever made.
I didnt know 1408 was a King story. Isnt that the movie with Jim Carey? It was ok, but kind of confusing.
No idea who that guy was but it was definitely not Carey :) I don't think horrors are his cup of tea anyway...
John Kusak was the guy.

bookworm1983
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Post by bookworm1983 »

I saw the film adaption of the Green Mile before I read the book. I found the film to be a pretty accurate representation of the book. The one point it deviated from the book I actually liked the film more. It was the way in which Paul found out about John Coffey's innocence. I rather liked the idea of John Coffey showing Paul what he couldn't tell him. On the flip side I read the book Misery before I saw the movie and I liked the book better. It was so much more thrilling and suspenseful to follow along with the character as he slowly realized what was happening to him. The movie went by too fast. I've seen Shawshank Redemption but never read the book, didn't know it was a Stephen King novel though. I loved the movie. I also saw the film adaptation of Secret Window and it creeped me out big time.

-- 05 Nov 2011, 19:28 --
Bighuey wrote:I guess I was thinking of something different. There was a horror movie with Jim Carey a few years ago, it seems the title was a hotel room number.
Not quite, the name of the movie was The Number 23, and it was a pretty good one.

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Mel Carriere
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Post by Mel Carriere »

The one thing about the Shawshank Redemption was that they niced it up for the cinematic audience. In the story, which I don't remember the title to right now, but it came out in the book "Different Seasons," the main character was in jail for killing his wife and child by cutting the brake lines on their car, or something to that effect. In the movie I think the Tim Robbins character is doing time for offing his cheating wife. I think the hardened con who kills his wife and kid for insurance money is a bit more interesting, but I can understand why Hollywood needs a main character that can inspire a little more sympathy from the audience.

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StephenKingman
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Post by StephenKingman »

Mel Carriere wrote:The one thing about the Shawshank Redemption was that they niced it up for the cinematic audience. In the story, which I don't remember the title to right now, but it came out in the book "Different Seasons," the main character was in jail for killing his wife and child by cutting the brake lines on their car, or something to that effect. In the movie I think the Tim Robbins character is doing time for offing his cheating wife. I think the hardened con who kills his wife and kid for insurance money is a bit more interesting, but I can understand why Hollywood needs a main character that can inspire a little more sympathy from the audience.

The full title of the novella was "Rita Hayworth and The Shawshank Redemption" and you're right, it was in Different Seasons, i agree with the slight change of character for the movie, audiences probably wouldnt swallow a man claiming he didn't murder his wife for insurance!
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bookworm1983
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Post by bookworm1983 »

So in the original story he was guilty? And of a much worse crime? Yes, I think I would have a hard time identifying with him if such was the case.

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StephenKingman
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Post by StephenKingman »

bookworm1983 wrote:So in the original story he was guilty? And of a much worse crime? Yes, I think I would have a hard time identifying with him if such was the case.
No it was a set up from the start, nobody would want him to escape had he done the crime :D
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bookworm1983
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Post by bookworm1983 »

Where can I find Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption? Is it a short story or a book?

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StephenKingman
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Post by StephenKingman »

bookworm1983 wrote:Where can I find Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption? Is it a short story or a book?
Its a short story, one of four in his book "Different Seasons".
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titan21
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Post by titan21 »

The last Steven King book I read was The Dome which I really enjoyed - but having seen the adaptations of some his novels I dread to think how this would turn out in the wrong hands... :( Dreamcatcher - the movie - turned me off Steven King for a long time!

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Mel Carriere
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Post by Mel Carriere »

I can't agree with you on Under the Dome. I read it two Xmas ago, when it first came out, and it left me flat. I can't exactly say why, I just could not identify with the characters. I thought one of the best Stephen King adaptations was "The Mist," which had a horrible twist of an ending that was extremely disturbing yet interesting. The book version ending just leaves you in a mysterious, ambiguous place. Did anybody else enjoy the film version of "The Mist?", or is this just another example of "The Tommyknocker Syndrome" where I love it and everybody else hates it?

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Post by titan21 »

I've seen The MIst and I have to say it is one of my guilty pleasures. It's a terrible film but is useful if you need to waste 90 minutes. There are quite a few dodgy camera shots. The ending is particularly powerful.

With regards to The Dome - I actually think it's a great story but where it goes wrong is the ending. The whole book is about something incredible and the way the characters react is fascinating. The ending makes it seem comical. I wouldn't deter anyone from reading it though. It's a case of the journey being better than the destination. The Stand has the same problem - it's a great read but ends weakly. :(

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StephenKingman
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Post by StephenKingman »

I really loved The Dome...until the ending which was a hastily-thrown-together copout in my opinion. King cannot build such a large book on a grand concept as an invisible dome imprisoning a whole town without having a pretty impressive explanation for same- throwing a nonsensical sci-fi ending just spoiled the whole book.

The Mist wasnt a bad adaptation, certainly no classic but better than many other horror movies out there and in my view better than The Fog, which i never really rated.
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Mel Carriere
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Post by Mel Carriere »

I think King should have built up the whole Animal Farm, totalitarian, thug rule aspect of life under the dome a little more. That part was semi interesting. It might have been better if he would have just ended the story without ever really revealing why the dome was there at all. That would have been thought provoking, I think.

Sometimes King makes the mistake of thinking he has to wrap everything up cleanly. His biggest mistake was the end of the Dark Tower. It should have ended exactly after Roland cries out the name of his friends who have perished in the quest, then goes into the Tower, and then the door slams shut. I thought that was awesome, and I think I cried it was so powerful. Then he makes the mistake of giving you the last chapter of what happened after he went into the tower. That was miserably anti-climatic.

I still enjoy Stephen King Immensely, but if he has a fault, it is leaving well enough alone.

titan21
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Post by titan21 »

Mel Carriere wrote:It might have been better if he would have just ended the story without ever really revealing why the dome was there at all.
I couldn't agree more. That would have been a perfect ending in my view.

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