strong character of a woman

Use this forum to discuss the April 2018 Book of the Month, "Ironbark Hill" by Jennie Linnane
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gen_g
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Re: strong character of a woman

Post by gen_g »

Natalie's ability to rise up to the challenge of her unhappy family definitely deserves a commendation; this in turn contributes to her emotional and psychological maturity. Whilst admirable, I would think that it is necessary to list our definition of a strong woman before describing Natalie as such. Of course, Natalie's ability to stand up to a position of authority demonstrates mental fortitude, as it is not easy to do what is right, instead of what is easy (I'm a potter head). All in all, it was a great tale of courage and self-discovery. It was an enjoyable read.
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Post by Human314 »

What I find sad is that all of that character development and build up of her as a strong character is ruined by her decision at the end of the novel.
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Post by holsam_87 »

pinklover wrote: 01 Apr 2018, 03:07 Does the prologue convey strong character of a woman when it portrays an unhappy home?
Yes, I think it does. In the prologue, we see Natalie all ready to defend her mother with no thought of herself. It also gets under Alex's skin every time she stands up to him.
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Post by charmaineperit »

Spirit Wandering wrote: 01 Apr 2018, 10:05
Bettercallyourbookie wrote: 01 Apr 2018, 09:04 I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)
I would agree that being resilient in the face of hardship does qualify as strength. It is unfortunate but true that, for many of us, the experience of hardship is what brings maturity and growth of one's personality. I enjoy evolving character development in a novel, as it encourages the potential for us to do the same in our own lives.
Character development is always a big factor in good books :)
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Post by Lgs1089 »

Coming from an unhappy home doesn't make a person weak, just unfortunate.
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Post by strawberrysab »

An unhappy upbringing can only shape a strong character. In the end, it's about survival.
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Post by Ana_Saints »

I strongly believe that the character portrays a really strong woman for Natalie did her best to protect her home.
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Post by ZenaLei7 »

Yes, I think that the character portrays a really strong woman for Natalie did her best to protect her home. She protected her siblings and defended her mother.
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Post by dtb »

FayJac wrote: 01 Apr 2018, 22:04 I think a strong character is very evident and even necessary in an unhappy home. Strength comes from trials and even someone from a happy home is not immune to problems and character building events. It was a very interesting book, but I was saddened to see her slide into more and more lies and a romance with a married man. That does not show strong character in a good way. The good strength we see in Natalie was in defending and providing for her family and withstanding the abuse and derogatory behavior shown to her.
I agree with you. Some people are born strong, but in an abusive situation, strength is there even if it doesn't appear that way to people outside of the situation. And I like that you point out the different types of strength.
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Post by Cristal2408 »

EMoffat wrote: 22 Apr 2018, 21:50 I believe that the daughter shows strength through the portrayal of an unhappy home.The mother also shows her own strength in difficult circumstances - it is too easy to judge people in these situations and say they are weak
I agree. They were strong in their circumstances.
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Post by Alex Hughes »

Yeah the daughter showed more strength
of character in protecting her mother.
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Post by cristinaro »

KLafser wrote: 05 Apr 2018, 12:40
cristinaro wrote: 03 Apr 2018, 03:11 I think the author used a good strategy by introducing Natalie and her family exactly when Natalie turned 16. Any reader in this world would immediately empathize with the protagonist, would appreciate her strength and would be willing to forgive her future mistakes. The question is: will our feelings and opinion about Natalie change up to the end of the story? I'll come back with an answer once I finish reading.
Completely agree! We need this backdrop to understand from whence she came in order to understand what happens and where she goes next.
I loved the ending of the book for its sadness and realism. The problem is I am not sure what to say about Natalie's strength anymore. She thinks she was strong and that she overcame her condition and trauma. I am not so sure about this. She never got married, she never had any children of her own, she got involved in a lifelong relationship with a married man. I don't think she managed to overcome her trauma.
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Post by ayoomisope »

Bettercallyourbookie wrote: 01 Apr 2018, 09:04 I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)
Wow. This is one beautifully constructed comment. The relationship between strong character and character development exhibited in the book is surely a compelling highlight.
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Post by Christina Rose »

Bettercallyourbookie wrote: 01 Apr 2018, 09:04 I think the prologue does convey strength of character even in an unhappy home.

Consider a few things for me: does circumstance define the strength of a character? If it doesn't, what does? If it does, doesn't being resilient in the face of hardships qualify as strength?

Also, even if she wasn't a strong character in the prologue, does that really matter? One of the most compelling things for me when I read a new book is character development. The process of finding that strength and resilience will probably be a better story than her being an unchanging source of strength throughout the entire novel.

Just food for thought. :)
Character development is big for me, too. So, I agree that the process of finding the much needed strength and resilience is the better angle.
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Post by Cate Mbevi »

I believe that situations and experiences transform us and even strengthen our character.
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